Casa Fernandez Aganorsa Leaf Maduro

 

Country: USA/Miami
Wrapper: Mexico (also available in Nicaraguan Corojo)
Binder: Nicaragua
Filler: Nicaragua
Price: $8.00  - $9.00

Available in 4 sizes:
El Supremo  - 6" X 58 (Gordo),
Illustre - 
5" X 48 (Robusto)
lire - 6 1/2" X50 (Toro) [pictured]
Robusto Extra - 5" X 54 (Robusto)

Q&A

Paul Palmer
President

Cigar geeks have known the Aganorsa name to be synonymous with excellent tobacco, but most casual cigar smokers have no clue what Aganorsa stands for. Could you explain what it means and why it is on the label of this cigar?

We registered the brand Casa Fernandez Aganorsa Leaf because it made sense and because Aganorsa is the name of our parent company. It’s also the identifier for the leaf that we grow. Aganorsa itself is an acronym for an agriculture conglomerate (Agricola Ganadera Nortena S.A.). We registered that brand about five years ago. The first offering for it was three sizes in a box-pressed Corojo (referring to the wrapper leaf), and two years ago we created the CF Aganorsa Leaf Maduro which is covered with a Mexican San Andres wrapper and is currently available in four sizes.

So before you launched the brand, the Aganorsa name was only visible to those who travelled to Estelí, Nicaragua and upon entering the town looked to the left and saw the company’s sign. How much has that awareness increased in recent years?

Well, the Aganorsa name has gained in popularity; there’s no question. It’s gained for several reasons; the name is being discussed in feature articles in magazines, by bloggers, and everything else. But customers are becoming more aware of Aganorsa because it just has a very unique flavor. 

What tobacco varieties does Aganorsa grow and which is the one that imparts that signature sweetness?

Primarily we farm Corojo ’99 Cuban seed, Corojo 2006, and Criollo but the Corojo ’99 Cuban seed is the one that is fresh and sweet on the palate.

Speaking of farming, what does the Aganorsa tobacco farming operation look like? What regions do you grow in and what does each region bring to the table?

We only farm in Nicaragua; in Jalapa Valley, Condega Valley, and Esteli. We have about seven farms in Jalapa, which is where we grow most of our cover leaf. Jalapa is most like Pinar del Rio (Cuba); it’s known for flavor and aroma. In Condega Valley we have about two farms and we grow most of our Criollo there and it’s a little bit different as far as blending attributes. It’s spicier, it’s sweeter, it’s kind of refined. And then you have Esteli; we have about two farms there. Esteli is known for power, its black volcanic soil. It’s the combination of the three regions and the combination of all the farms and the lots within the farms that give you the complexity in the cigar.

While the original Casa Fernández Aganorsa Leaf had a Corojo wrapper, the one being featured in this breakdown has a Mexican Maduro wrapper.
How did you arrive at this wrapper for this blend?

In the old days we used to use Criollo for our Maduro cigars. It would go through about four iterations of fermentation until we got it dark and that’s what we’d use for Maduro. Unfortunately there isn’t enough Criollo to maintain our demand for Maduro because the U.S. market has a high demand for it. So that being said, we found that the San Andres Morron (a wrapper tobacco grown in Mexico) really pairs well with our tobacco. We’ve used Broadleaf but very sparingly and not in our own brands (referring to the brands that they manufacture for other cigar companies). But the San Andres works really well in our blends and we’ve received a lot of great feedback and a lot of great ratings on that particular cover leaf.